Episode 59 – Android

AndroidOn today’s show, we’re looking at the smartphone after the iPhone, that changed everything… the Android phone. It, as well as the iPhone, define all smartphones to this day, as well as the third tier. This is the podcast where we take an informal look at personal computing history through the lens of eBay auctions. It’s sort of like Antiques Roadshow, but all about antique personal computers.

Links mentioned in this episode:

Auctions:

Visit Jeff’s page at vintagevolts.com

Visit David’s page at classiccomputing.com

Send feedback to feedback@HistoryOfPersonalComputing.com because we really would love to receive your email or audio comment.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HistoryofPersonalComputing/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/HistoryofPC

Vintage Computer Forum: http://www.vcfed.org/forum/forum.php

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Episode 58 – Apple iPhone

On today’s show, we’re looking at the smartphone that changed everything, the iPhone. Its influence went on to define all smartphones, as well as the third tier. This is the podcast where we take an informal look at personal computing history through the lens of eBay auctions. It’s sort of like Antiques Roadshow, but all about antique personal computers.

iPhone

Links mentioned in this episode:

Auctions:

Send feedback to feedback@HistoryOfPersonalComputing.com because we really would love to receive your email or audio comment.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HistoryofPersonalComputing/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/HistoryofPC

Vintage Computer Forum: http://www.vcfed.org/forum/forum.php

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Episode 57 – Early Smartphones

On today’s show, we begin our look at the final evolution of the third tier of personal computing, the smartphone. Were there really smartphones before the iPhone and Android phones? Well… yes. This is the podcast where we take an informal look at personal computing history through the lens of eBay auctions. It’s sort of like Antiques Roadshow, but all about antique personal computers.

Links mentioned in this episode:

Auctions:

Send feedback to feedback@HistoryOfPersonalComputing.com because we really would love to receive your email or audio comment.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HistoryofPersonalComputing/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/HistoryofPC

Vintage Computer Forum: http://www.vcfed.org/forum/forum.php

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Episode 56 – First Computers, Part 2

David and Jeff continue to look back on the earlier times of computer retail by relating their experiences with their own history of ownership of personal computers.imac_thinkpad

Links mentioned in this episode:


Jeff’s fifth computer:

David’s fifth computer:

Jeff’s sixth computer:

David’s sixth computer:

Jeff’s seventh computer:

David’s seventh computer:

Jeff’s eighth computer:

David’s eighth computer:

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Episode 55 – First Computers

Commodore 64 Ad

Commodore 64 Ad

For the new year, David and Jeff have decided to look back on the earlier times of computer retail by relating their experiences in getting their first computers.

Links mentioned in this episode:


Jeff’s first computer:

  • Commodore VIC-20
    • Bought at Computers Unlimited, York, PA in October 1981 for $325.
    • Tandy Color Computer and Atari 400 were considered

David’s first computer:

Jeff’s second computer:

  • Commodore 64
    • Bought at Fort Hood, TX AAFES store in Spring 1985 for $150-$200.
    • Got a Commodore Datasette and put a 1541 disk drive on lay-a-way.

David’s second computer:

Jeff’s third computer:

  • Commodore 128
    • Bought with 1571 disk drive at the Incirlik Air Force base in Incirlik, Turkey for about $500 for the pair.
    • Set it up immediately in the motel room during my stay at the base.
    • Had to sell my Commodore 64 because who needed TWO computers!

David’s third computer:

  • Commodore 64C
    • Purchased at the U.S. Army AAFES electronics store in Darmstadt, Germany in the summer of 1991.
    • Google search for “commodore test pilot” Images for commodore test pilot

Jeff’s fourth computer:

  • Commodore Amiga
    • Used my tax return to buy it
    • Had to wait for EB to ship it to me
  • Was blown away at the graphics and sound.
  • Google search for “Electronics Boutique” Images for Electronics Boutique
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EB_Games
    • Bought from Electronics Boutique in early 1989 for around $600
    • Did not have an Analog RGB monitor. To my surprise, it came with an A520 color composite adapter, so I used an NTSC monitor.

David’s fourth computer:

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